Brad Grey (Brad Alan Grey)

Brad Grey

Brad Grey was formerly chairman and chief executive officer of Paramount Pictures Corporation. Grey was named CEO in 2005. In his position, Grey was responsible for overseeing all feature film development and production for films distributed by Paramount Pictures Corporation including Paramount Pictures, Paramount Vantage, Paramount Classics, Paramount Insurge, MTV Films and Nickelodeon Movies. He was also responsible for the worldwide business operations for Paramount Pictures International, Paramount Famous Productions, Paramount Home Media Distribution, Paramount Animation, Studio Group and Worldwide Television Distribution. Among the commercial and critical hit films Paramount produced and/or distributed during Grey’s tenure were the Transformers, Paranormal Activity, and Iron Man franchises, Star Trek, How to Train Your Dragon, Shrek the Third, Mission: Impossible III, Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, An Inconvenient Truth, There Will Be Blood, No Country for Old Men, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Babel, Shutter Island, Up in the Air, The Fighter, True Grit, The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn, and Hugo. During his time as chairman and CEO of Paramount, the studio’s films were nominated for dozens of Academy Awards, including 20 in 2011 and 18 in 2012. In 2002, Brad Grey formed Plan B with Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston, with a first-look deal at Warner Bros. The company produced two films for Warner Bros: Tim Burton’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory with Johnny Depp, and Martin Scorsese’s The Departed, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, and Jack Nicholson. After Pitt and Aniston separated, Grey and Pitt moved the company to Paramount Pictures in 2005.

In 1996, Brillstein sold his shares of the Brillstein-Grey company to Grey, giving Grey full rein over operations; the company’s television unit was subsequently rechristened “Brad Grey Television”. Grey also ventured into film by producing the Adam Sandler hit, Happy Gilmore. Brad Grey is a multiple Golden Globe, BAFTA, PGA and Emmy Award winner, as well as a four-time recipient of the George Foster Peabody Award. Since arriving at Paramount in 2005, Chairman and CEO Grey has led a return to fortune at the box office. He has overseen the creation or revitalization of several major franchises, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, Star Trek, and Paranormal Activity, which was made for $15,000 and generated $192 million at the global box office. Paranormal Activity 2 grossed $177 million worldwide, and the third installment in the franchise collected $205.7 million worldwide in 2011. A fourth installment was released in October 2012. The studio’s 2011 results included Transformers: Dark of the Moon, which grossed more than $1.1 billion worldwide, and Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, whose $694 million global box office tally makes it the most successful entry in that franchise. Paramount’s 2012 slate included The Dictator which earned $179 million on a $65 million budget. Paramount has also forged productive relationships with top-tier filmmakers and talent including J. J. Abrams, Michael Bay and Martin Scorsese. In 2011, leveraging the success of Rango, the studio’s first original, computer-animated release, Grey oversaw the launch of a new animation division, Paramount Animation.

The 2010 Paramount slate achieved much success with Shutter Island and True Grit reaching the biggest box office totals in the storied careers of Martin Scorsese and the Coen brothers, respectively. In addition, during Grey’s tenure, Paramount launched its own worldwide releasing arm, Paramount Pictures International, and has released acclaimed films such as An Inconvenient Truth, Up in the Air and There Will Be Blood. The success of Paranormal Activity also led to the creation of a low-budget releasing label Insurge Pictures, which released Justin Bieber: Never Say Never, which has collected nearly $100 million in worldwide box office revenue. Brad Grey was ousted from Paramount Pictures shortly before his death, a result of a power struggle between his backers and the family of majority owner Sumner Redstone, along with a series of flops that cost the studio $450 million in losses. Brad Grey died on May 14, 2017 from cancer at his Holmby Hills home in Los Angeles, California with his family by his side. He was 59.

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Born

  • December, 29, 1957
  • USA
  • New York, New York

Died

  • May, 14, 2017
  • USA
  • Los Angeles, California

Cause of Death

  • cancer

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