Saeed al-Ghamdi (Saeed Abdallah Ali Sulayman al-Ghamdi)

Saeed al-Ghamdi

On June 12, 2001 Saeed al-Ghamdi applied for and received a second two-year US B-1/B-2 (tourist/business) visa in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His application was submitted by a local travel agency and processed through Visa Express, a controversial US visa program in Saudi Arabia which was discontinued the following year. Arriving in the U.S. on June 27, 2001 with Fayez Banihammad, Saeed al-Ghamdi shared an apartment with Ahmed al-Nami in Delray Beach, Florida. Oddly, he listed the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida as his permanent address on his driver’s license. He was one of 9 hijackers to open a SunTrust bank account with a cash deposit around June 2001. Saeed occasionally trained on simulators at the FlightSafety Aviation School in Vero Beach, Florida together with Mohand al-Shehri and Abdulaziz al-Omari. On the morning of September 11, 2001, Ghamdi boarded United Airlines Flight 93 without incident. Due to the flight’s delay, the pilot and crew were notified of the previous hijackings that day, and were told to be on the alert. Within minutes, Flight 93 was hijacked as well.

At least two of the cellphone calls made by passengers indicate that all the hijackers they saw were wearing red bandanas. The calls also indicated that one of the men had tied a box around his torso, and claimed there was a bomb inside; it is not known which hijacker this was. According to the Cockpit transcript released later, it appeared Saeed al-Ghamdi may have been at the controls of the flight when it crashed, although the 9/11 commission asserts that Ziad Jarrah was the pilot. Passengers on the plane heard through phone calls the fates of the other hijacked planes. A passenger uprising resulted in the plane crashing into a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, killing everyone aboard.

Born

  • November, 21, 1979
  • Al Bahah Province, Saudi Arabia

Died

  • September, 11, 2001
  • USA
  • Shanksville, Pennsylvania

Cause of Death

  • plane crash

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